Monday, 24 November 2014

I do love Vintage Blankets - but, when is one blanket a blanket too many? When you can't find the floor!

Last week I was in a bit of a quandary about my sewing room - how much floor space do I really need for walking on and how much do I need for storing (or rather piling things) onto. All my cupboards and surfaces are already full of  'resources' and PhD's (Projects half done). I think you know what I mean.
I have a terrible weakness for vintage blankets. I love their textures, colours, stripes and most of all their labels.
BUT - I had to be realistic and have a sort out. I needed to reclaim back some of my sewing room floor from my encroaching stash! There are lots of projects I have in mind that I would like to complete over winter and I really do need some space. So... here are some of the treasures I have found new homes for.
















Monday, 17 November 2014

Kaffe Fassett Exhibition 2014 at the American Museum, Bath

The colourful collections of Kaffe Fassett have been on exhibition at the American Museum in Bath all summer, in a detached building set away from the main museum at Claverton Manor.
When I visited in early autumn, the building was partly hidden behind a large tree covered in textile 'lanterns' and shrouded in mist. It was a mystical treasure waiting to be discovered.
Entering the building I felt an immediate assault on my senses of COLOUR!
The main theme running through the entire exhibition was colour, colour and more colour detailing the knitting, needlework and patchwork of Kaffe. His mind must be in a constant whirlwind of colour.
Although I found his large pieces stunning and the level of stitch and design involved in their creation fascinating, some of my favourite pieces were his mood board displays, detailing his journey of ideas, from initial inspiration through to the final designs and collections.
Here are some of the photos from the day.
















Tuesday, 11 November 2014

Poppies at the Tower of London 2014


Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red.
Created by ceramic artist Paul Cummins, with setting by stage designer Tom Piper, 88,246 ceramic poppies have slowly filled the Tower's famous moat over the summer, the last poppy being planted on the 11th November 2014 as part of the Armistice Remembrance Day. Each poppy representing a British and Commonwealth military fatality during WW1.

I visited on a day when the sun was shining. It was a sight to behold seeing a glinting sea of red. The expanse of the installation is breathtaking and quite moving when one thinks of its significance.

Dismantling of the display will start after Armistice.  A portion of the installation will tour the UK and later go on display at London's Imperial War Museum. Each poppy has been sold off to raise funds for Service and Military Charities.
Here are some of the images from the Tower of London.



Each poppy sits on a metal stake, placed firmly in the soft earth
The Wave Display

A glinting Sea of Red 


The second of two Weeping displays

One of the two Weeping displays

Poppies laid on the ground





Volunteers laying the last few poppies

Here are some panoramic shots I took. 
I wanted to remember the expanse of the display and the huge crowds of people.




Monday, 10 November 2014

The Knitting and Stitching Show 2014, Alexandra Palace, London - Part 3 - WW1 Remembered

At textile exhibitions, I find there are generally one or two pieces of work that I find myself drawn to. It might be it's construction, colour, techniques incorporated, or textures created that lure me in.
The following piece was so stunning. I was going to include it in one of my previous posts, but it is so unique, it needs a post all of its own to be appreciated fully.
This is a piece in memory of the fallen in WW1.... which was a running theme at the Show this Centenary year.
Created by Susan Canfield called "Time held me Green and Dying"  from textile group Between the Lines: East Anglia Stitch Textiles.











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